24 November, 2014

Paul Sagar

Our Collective Afterlife

Sagar finds that, for Scheffler, our values are much more complicated than we might otherwise have realised them to be.


Jennifer Rushworth

The First English (Scottish?) Proust

Jean Findlay's biography of C. K. Scott Moncrieff reveals him as much more than the first translator of Proust.


Karthick Manoharan

Introduce a Little Anarchy

Manoharan considers the limits of the moral superiority of anarchism in the latest collection of Chomsky's essays.


Jean-Thomas Tremblay

After the Fall

Edan Lepucki's debut novel, California, explores the narrative possibilities offered by American society after its decline.


Emily Anderson

Between a Dandy and a Soldier

Gibson's biography of H. H. Munro attempts to discern the man from his authorial persona, the humorist Saki.


10 November, 2014

Harry Stopes

The Elephant in the Room

Stopes contends that Niven's latest is a sequel to Folk Opposition, looking at the politics behind Oasis's first album.


Kristin Grogan

The Storms that Rise in It

Robinson's Lila feels like yet another form of prayer: for America and its dispossessed, for literature, for the lonely.


Nicole Lobdell

Peculiar Things: Victorian Bric-à-Brac

For Lobdell, this is a collection that pushes the boundaries of what most readers would consider bric-à-brac.


Fergus McGhee

His Itchy Intelligence

Rembrandt: the Late Works at the National Gallery shows a passionate intellect, searching, sifting, never at rest.


Gabriel Roberts

Clear and Distinct Ideas

Roberts reviews Billig's criticism of writing in the social sciences, concluding that he underestimates the problem.