30 June, 2014

Rosie Lavan

Seamus Heaney’s Places

In light of Seamus Heaney's recent death, Richard Russell scrupulously reorients the poet in relation to place.


Jennifer Thorp

Oases And Mirages In The Desert Of ‘After Proust’

Jennifer Thorp finds Anne Carson's precise control of the bathetic sentence makes less of an outing than usual in her newest work.


Nathan Pinkoski

Revising the Reading of Aristotle

The greatest feature of Pangle’s commentary is that it has brought an interpretative approach into a wider conversation.


Daveen Koh

On Going for a Walk

Daveen Koh finds Frederic Gros' book to be limited in scope but nevertheless a commendable achievement and a delightful read.


Kit Coldstream

Getting Away With It

Geordie Greig presents Lucian Freud in a cleverly constructed volume that errs on the side of sensational at times, but with authority.


16 June, 2014

Peter Hill

Imperialism in the Valley of the Shadow of Death

Despite his imperialistic overtones, it is not possible simply to dismiss John Buchan as a jingoistic thriller-writer.


Ardevan Yaghoubi

Something Fishy: the Politics of Human Rights History

Compared with Melville’s Moby Dick, Samuel Moyn's new Human Rights book is not without obstacles.


John Ritzema

A Light to Lighten the Gentiles

Timothy Michael Law calls for a return to the study of the Septuagint as the great document of the rise of Christianity.


Tom Cutterham

Factories in the Field

Roberts' book reminds readers to consider struggles over discipline, time, pay, and workers' rights around the world.


Anna Brinkman

The New Plebeian Experience

Martin Breaugh provides an illuminating discussion of, but no solution for, plebeian experiences old and new.