8 December, 2014

Martin Willis

n = 1: Valuing Literature and Science

Martin Willis explores what we should value in literature's engagement with science and in the study of that engagement.


Sarah Hanks

Science and Books in an Age of Reform

Secord's Visions of Science weaves together the politics, press, and science of the early nineteenth century.


Alice Bamford

Proofs and Catastrophes

Bamford considers Ian Hacking's exploration origin myths of the discovery of proof and Roubaud's Mathematics: (A novel) .


Gillian Daw

Point of View: Astronomical and Literary Perception

Henchman's The Starry Sky Within is a thought-provoking interdisciplinary work that requires some astronomical expertise.


Anja A. Drautzburg

The Theatricality of Flinching

Watt Smith traces the ways in which the perception and understanding of looking and observing changed from 1872 to 1918.


24 November, 2014

Paul Sagar

Our Collective Afterlife

Sagar finds that, for Scheffler, our values are much more complicated than we might otherwise have realised them to be.


Jennifer Rushworth

The First English (Scottish?) Proust

Jean Findlay's biography of C. K. Scott Moncrieff reveals him as much more than the first translator of Proust.


Karthick Manoharan

Introduce a Little Anarchy

Manoharan considers the limits of the moral superiority of anarchism in the latest collection of Chomsky's essays.


Jean-Thomas Tremblay

After the Fall

Edan Lepucki's debut novel, California, explores the narrative possibilities offered by American society after its decline.


Emily Anderson

Between a Dandy and a Soldier

Gibson's biography of H. H. Munro attempts to discern the man from his authorial persona, the humorist Saki.