3 June, 2014

Ramin Nassehi

Development as Unfreedom

Easterly’s book tackles the current technocratic approach to developmental aid and urges us to question it altogether.


Edward Hicks

From Cuneiform to e-books

This interesting but weighty tome suffers from lack of a single argument drawing the magnanimity of its project together.


Katherine Manfred

“We Are the New Meteorite”

Kolbert relates scientifically valid theories in a refreshingly neutral tone as a powerful warning against anthropogenic destruction.


Kit Coldstream

Aspects of Virtuosity

Beauclerk offers a more psychologically subtle and analytical treatment of the pianist than previous biographies.


Paul Sagar

A Broken Clock

Our reviewer explores whether Raymond Geuss deserves his negative reputation in the world of political philosophy.


19 May, 2014

Will Harris

What’s New, Parmenides?

Though engaging, Michael North’s attempt at Novelty is a Lucretian exercise in the rearrangement of familiar elements.


Shahla Haque

Donna Tartt’s Paintbrush

Donna Tartt's Pulitzer Prize winner is 'redolent and compelling' at times, but the characters and plot fall flat and thin.


Calum Mechie

Bannockburns’ Shortfalls

Robert Crawford misses some of the story by telescoping seven centuries of history into the legacy of one battle.


Christy Edwall

Contractions

Lydia Davis' newest collection flashes moments of brilliance, but lacks the consistency and generosity exemplary of her work.


Judyta Frodyma

“Excuse Emily and her Atoms”

Dickinson's envelope poems peel of the pages of this beautifully organized and presented exhibit-book.