12 March, 2012Issue 18.5Photo EssaysThe ArtsVisual Arts

Email This Article Print This Article

Urban Canvas

Agnieszka Burzynska

Whether or not graffiti can be defined as contemporary art, one cannot deny that urban frescoes gatecrash our lives without warning, leaving us to discuss their expressional rights and aesthetic value. Every street of every city has some human handprint of this kind: graffiti, a template sprayed on a pavement, a poster, or just a sticker glued to a road sign or the back window of a bus. As with gallery art, not all of us will like what we see. We may ask why it exists, what it achieves, and sometimes it will shake us to reflect on something that we hadn’t previously considered.

In urban art, an entire building may serve as a three-dimensional canvas, or some part of it—a bricked-up window, say—can inhibit the aesthetic properties of a frame. Walls may be transformed into political statements, pavements into advertising space. On an old, scratched wall in Amsterdam, somebody has used blue Scotch tape to say, “you are unique”. These images fascinate me. As a photographer, I try to lose myself in the deep recesses of a city whenever I can.

 

Urban Art

.

*
.

Urban Art

.

*
.

Urban Art

.

*

.

Urban Art

.

*
.

Urban Art

.

*
.

Urban Art

.

*
.

Urban Art

.

*
.

Urban Art

.

*
.

Urban Art

.

*
.

Agnieszka Burzynska is a photographer from Oxford. Visit her facebook page to see more of her work.