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Weekly Round-Up: Piketty, Ukraine, Hopkins, Parentheses, Beerbohm, Gay Sex

The Oxonian Review presents the Weekly Round-up, featuring articles the editorial staff have found interesting, illuminating, or otherwise noteworthy.

1. “Paul Krugman: ‘Why We’re in a New Gilded Age’“, The New York Review of Books: If you read one piece about Thomas Piketty’s timely and shattering critique of inequality (and you should), make it this one. “What Piketty calls ‘a drift toward oligarchy’ can be halted and even reversed if the body politic so chooses.”

2. “Timothy Snyder: ‘Ukrainian extremists will only triumph if Russia invades’“, The New Republic: Situating events in Ukraine in a rich historical and geopolitical context, Snyder warns that only “a united Europe can… respond adequately to an aggressive Russian petrostate.”

3. “Helen Vendler: ‘Melancholy Hopkins’“, The London Review of Books: Helen Vendler welcomes a new edition of Gerard Manley Hopkins’s letters. “Even in profound depression, Hopkins remained immutably honest in aesthetic judgment, a great and rare virtue… counterbalancing to the end his anxious fears and his recurrent sorrows.”

4. “Christopher Benfey: ‘Pain and Parentheses’“, The New York Review of Books: What does it mean to put suffering in brackets? “Masquerading as mere asides, they might hold more punch than parentheses are usually expected to hold, more even than the surrounding sentences, and have all the more impact for their disguise as throwaways.”

5. “Andrew Gimson: ‘In Search of the Incomparable Max’“, Standpoint: A personal eulogy for a neglected genius. “This capacity to be in possession of someone’s innermost thoughts, and to reveal them in pictures as well as words, Max possessed to an extraordinary degree.”

6. “Caleb Crain: ‘How Much Gay Sex Should a Novel Have?’“, The New Yorker: Crain charts the rise and fall of the homosexual in fiction. “If a writer who happens to be gay is at all ambitious, he will have fairly complicated opinions about sexual arousal in prose.”

 

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